Nova Scotian Museo
Home Archive Random Mobile RSS Feed Ask

As a heritage professional who works in an aviation museum, I gotta reblog this- I love these images and I love these kind of articles.

wiirouttheboxx:

BLACK HISTORY(Day 4): Often time women, especially black women, are placed last in our minds when it comes to making history. We all know about the famous Tuskegee Airmen, but have you ever thought about women being pilots in those times as well? Start thinking and do your research on these extraordinary women. Today we honor the often overlooked Tuskegee Airwomen.

(via lostinhistory)

# aviation history# aviation heritage# aviation# airwomen
nparts:

Make Museums Free: What we can learn from Britain and WashingtonAfter two or three centuries in business, public museums have developed into one of the splendours of democracy, the only places where private taste meets elite scholarship and we all pursue our own passions at our own pace. It’s an arena of opinion that permits individualism and innovation to come magnificently alive.Just one thing is wrong: Going to a museum in Canada costs money. Unlike parks, libraries and cathedrals, museums have box offices. If two adults take three teenagers to the National Gallery in Ottawa, they pay $18. That’s to enter a building that their taxes built, to see art that they, being citizens, own. The Vancouver Art Gallery, which charges $17.50 for an individual ticket, offers a family rate (maximum two adults and four children) for $50, plus tax. Paddy Johnson, a Canadian curator who runs an art blog from Brooklyn, recently wrote: “I’ve never thought the public should be charged to see their own belongings.”That’s also the British view. In Britain most of the national museums are entirely free, most of the time. In Washington the array of museums run by the Smithsonian Institution on the Mall proudly advertises “admission always free.”Unfortunately, while charging money at the door supports the running of a museum, it also strengthens the wretched idea that the arts and sciences are the business of a few specialists and the well-to-do. Although many museums have free days or free hours, the existence of a regular ticket price sets the tone. It especially discourages those who find museums a shade intimidating.

I loved that the big national institutions in England didn’t charge an admission fee.  I hope that some day, people can visit the CMC and other institutions free of charge. 

nparts:

Make Museums Free: What we can learn from Britain and Washington
After two or three centuries in business, public museums have developed into one of the splendours of democracy, the only places where private taste meets elite scholarship and we all pursue our own passions at our own pace. It’s an arena of opinion that permits individualism and innovation to come magnificently alive.

Just one thing is wrong: Going to a museum in Canada costs money. Unlike parks, libraries and cathedrals, museums have box offices. If two adults take three teenagers to the National Gallery in Ottawa, they pay $18. That’s to enter a building that their taxes built, to see art that they, being citizens, own. The Vancouver Art Gallery, which charges $17.50 for an individual ticket, offers a family rate (maximum two adults and four children) for $50, plus tax. Paddy Johnson, a Canadian curator who runs an art blog from Brooklyn, recently wrote: “I’ve never thought the public should be charged to see their own belongings.”

That’s also the British view. In Britain most of the national museums are entirely free, most of the time. In Washington the array of museums run by the Smithsonian Institution on the Mall proudly advertises “admission always free.”

Unfortunately, while charging money at the door supports the running of a museum, it also strengthens the wretched idea that the arts and sciences are the business of a few specialists and the well-to-do. Although many museums have free days or free hours, the existence of a regular ticket price sets the tone. It especially discourages those who find museums a shade intimidating.

I loved that the big national institutions in England didn’t charge an admission fee.  I hope that some day, people can visit the CMC and other institutions free of charge. 

(via nationalpost)

Deaccessions and “Stuff” vs. “Stuff that Matters”

Was having a browse through the RSS feed this morning and I came across a great post from the Uncataloged Museum, which brought me to something cool from the BBC.  Here they both are for your reading pleasure:

The Uncataloged Museum: Do You Need Every Single Thing?  “Often when conversations about new museum initiatives come up,  the reason for inaction is that there’s too much to do and not enough funding.  I won’t argue with the fact that right now is a really stressful financial time for every organization, but I do want to propose that perhaps, local history museums own too many meaningless objects—and that paying attention to meaningful objects will give us more time, more money, and more connections to our community.

BBC: A History of the World in 100 Objects.  (How would you ever pick?)

# contemporary collections# museums# museos# deaccessions# collections management
nationalpost:

William, Kate to fly Sea King, dragon boat race during Canadian visitPrince William, a Royal Air Force search and rescue pilot, will join his Canadian counterparts in landing a Sea King helicopter during his first visit to Canada as a newlywed.The royal tour kicks off in Ottawa, where the duke and duchess will visit the War Memorial and tomb of the unknown soldier the day before participating in Canada Day festivities on Parliament Hill.Moving east through Quebec, they’ll get a chance to show off their domestic skills cooking with students from the Institut de tourisme et d’hôtellerie du Québec, before travelling to Prince Edward Island.There, the newlyweds will be pitted against each other in dragon boat races across a lake at Dalvay-by-the-Sea, setting of the Anne of Green Gables novels of which Catherine is a longtime fan. (Photo: Toby Melville/Reuters)

I’m all the more gutted that they aren’t stopping in Nova Scotia now, if he’s for sure flying a Sea King during their visit they really ought to pass through Shearwater…  I’m sure his Sea King time will be spent in Ottawa.

nationalpost:

William, Kate to fly Sea King, dragon boat race during Canadian visit
Prince William, a Royal Air Force search and rescue pilot, will join his Canadian counterparts in landing a Sea King helicopter during his first visit to Canada as a newlywed.

The royal tour kicks off in Ottawa, where the duke and duchess will visit the War Memorial and tomb of the unknown soldier the day before participating in Canada Day festivities on Parliament Hill.

Moving east through Quebec, they’ll get a chance to show off their domestic skills cooking with students from the Institut de tourisme et d’hôtellerie du Québec, before travelling to Prince Edward Island.

There, the newlyweds will be pitted against each other in dragon boat races across a lake at Dalvay-by-the-Sea, setting of the Anne of Green Gables novels of which Catherine is a longtime fan. (Photo: Toby Melville/Reuters)

I’m all the more gutted that they aren’t stopping in Nova Scotia now, if he’s for sure flying a Sea King during their visit they really ought to pass through Shearwater…  I’m sure his Sea King time will be spent in Ottawa.

# sea king# naval aviation# naval air# CH 124# Wills & Kate
Hector returning to Pictou harbour

From cbc.ca:

The replica ship Hector will be back in Pictou this week after its absence last year led to a decline in visitors to the Nova Scotia town.

The town did not open the Hector Heritage Quay last year, saying it could not afford to run it anymore. A group of volunteers took over and plans to bring a refitted Hector home Tuesday.

Great news!  The Hector is prominent in my childhood museum and heritage site visit memories.

# Hector# good news# nova scotia# Pictou# volunteers# happy ending
richardmccoy:

I wonder how this got in the lab…. (Taken with Instagram at Indianapolis Museum of Art Conservation Department)

That is delightfully ridiculous.  I’ll obviously be one of the 99% forever because it never occurred to me that there’s sufficient market demand for dedicated chandelier cleaning products!

richardmccoy:

I wonder how this got in the lab…. (Taken with Instagram at Indianapolis Museum of Art Conservation Department)

That is delightfully ridiculous.  I’ll obviously be one of the 99% forever because it never occurred to me that there’s sufficient market demand for dedicated chandelier cleaning products!

# We are the 1%# rich people cleaning products
Casting Off the Corsets: a history of women's underwear

I would love to read this book!

# corsets# underwear# women's history# social history
Pretty sure you've always wanted to see me naked.. Well.. I'm feeling pretty adventurous today so go to datelink3(dot)com (switch [dot] with .) then sign up and find my profile under the username 'lolsummer69'. I hid my face in the pictures. but I want you to guess who I am and then hit me up on Facebook lol. Good luck. Anonymous

Die in a fire spambot that keeps sending this to me over and over!  >:O

Why is "World Class" so Classist?

Nina Simon is right- we need to re-claim the term “word class museum”. 

# museum 2.0# museums# world-class museum# art museum# art gallery# mexico
nerd-gasms:

bad-postcards:

Today is INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM DAY
On BAD POSTCARDS the museum is likely to be wax. Wax museum postcards are the baddest! Here’s one of my favorites.
I’ve noticed that the hands of many wax museum figures make them appear to have advanced arthritis. Poor Louis can’t bend his fingers enough to grasp the syringe. (Poor chinchilla! Oh, no, wait. He’s taxidermy.)

LOUIS PASTEUR (1822-1895)French chemist and bacteriologist, born Dec. 27, 1822. Won his “Bachelier es Lettres” at Royal College of Bessacon, 1840. Pioneered in fermentation research. Developed the first vaccination to control chicken cholera and anthrax. His greatest gift to mankind is the treatment for hydrophobia. On July 6, 1885 after prolonged experiments he inoculated a child who had been badly bitten by an infected dog and the experiment was a success. AN EXHIBIT AT POTTERS WAX MUSEUM, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA.


Reblogged to SHARE THE HORROR.

Happy International Museum Day everybody!  Later today, I’m going to share some behind-the-scenes photos from the Shearwater Aviation Museum.  Hope this tides you over until I get the chance to post later this afternoon.

nerd-gasms:

bad-postcards:

Today is INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM DAY

On BAD POSTCARDS the museum is likely to be wax. Wax museum postcards are the baddest! Here’s one of my favorites.

I’ve noticed that the hands of many wax museum figures make them appear to have advanced arthritis. Poor Louis can’t bend his fingers enough to grasp the syringe. (Poor chinchilla! Oh, no, wait. He’s taxidermy.)

LOUIS PASTEUR (1822-1895)
French chemist and bacteriologist, born Dec. 27, 1822. Won his “Bachelier es Lettres” at Royal College of Bessacon, 1840. Pioneered in fermentation research. Developed the first vaccination to control chicken cholera and anthrax. His greatest gift to mankind is the treatment for hydrophobia. On July 6, 1885 after prolonged experiments he inoculated a child who had been badly bitten by an infected dog and the experiment was a success. AN EXHIBIT AT POTTERS WAX MUSEUM, ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA.

Reblogged to SHARE THE HORROR.

Happy International Museum Day everybody!  Later today, I’m going to share some behind-the-scenes photos from the Shearwater Aviation Museum.  Hope this tides you over until I get the chance to post later this afternoon.

# museum humor# imd2011# international museum day
Powered by Tumblr. Theme by Reeckerz
1 / 4